Preview supports galleries and museums throughout the Pacific Northwest and we hope you will too, even during this particularily challenging time of COVID-19.
Be sure to check venue websites for updates and information.
Home » Feb – Mar 2021 Washington Vignettes

Feb – Mar 2021 Washington Vignettes

by admin

by Matthew Kangas

Natalie Niblack, Rudy Tooti, 2020. Photo: Niblack studio

SHELTERED: ARTISTS RESPOND TO COVID-19
Schack Art Center, Everett. To Mar 20

With plenty of time to shelter in place, invited Pacific Northwest artists have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic with a riotous mixture of humor, gravity and topicality. Nothing escapes political judgment or commentary anymore, including public health crises, so artists such as Natalie Niblack sent her hilarious ceramic busts of ex-president Donald Trump and his personal fixer, former New York mayor Rudolph Giuliani, both caught in deliciously embarrassing moments. Works by witty stalwarts like Juan Alonso-Rodriguez, Kelly Lyles and Steve Jensen also appear.

Marcio Diaz, Winter Light, 2020


MARCIO DIAZ: A CIRCLE AROUND THE SUN
ArtXchange Gallery, Seattle. Feb 4 – Mar 20

Before his 2007 arrival in the US, Marcio Diaz exhibited with other Nicaraguan artists in Germany and El Salvador. His art and architectural studies in Managua and Esteli reinforced influences of built environments, along with colors in nature, such as tropical flowers, parrot feathers and folkloric woven clothing. The new paintings for his third solo show at ArtXchange are an extension of his all-over fi elds of chromatic “bubbles” of color, hovering ceaselessly before our eyes.

Stacie Chappell, Mirage, 2020

STACIE CHAPPELL: EVEN THOUGH I WALK
Gallery IMA, Seattle. Mar 4 – 21

Currently an art instructor at Boise State University, in Idaho, Stacie Chappell continues her aggressively stroked, gestural paintings for her second solo exhibition at IMA since 2012. Vigorously colorful, with meandering forms and restless compositions, the pictures mix oil, acrylic, fabric dye and inks. Working on a “purely instinctual” level, Chappell calls them “abstract landscapes,” with no horizon line, vista or deep space visible.

A note of clarification

Anastacia-Reneé, Alice in Parts, 2020. Photo: Michael B. Maine

ANASTACIA-RENEÉ: (DON’T BE ABSURD) ALICE IN PARTS
Frye Art Museum, Seattle. To Apr 25

The preview of the Anastacia-Reneé exhibition that ran in our previous issue requires several clarifications. The Frye Art Museum show is part of a series spotlighting winners of the James W. Ray Awards, which support and advance the creative work of outstanding artists living and working in Washington State. Anastacia-Reneé received the 2018 James W. Ray Distinguished Artist Award. Her exhibition, (Don’t be Absurd) Alice in Parts, features installations related to Alice Metropolis, a fictional character invented by the artist; its content and theme of gentrifi cation are not place specific.