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Home Apr – May 2020 British Columbia Vignettes

Apr – May 2020 British Columbia Vignettes

by admin

By Robin Laurance

LUCAS GLENN & MAT GLENN, EXHIBITION INSTALLATION VIEW, KAG, 2019

CREATIVE GROWTH CENTRE FOR SPIRITUAL NOURISHMENT
Kelowna Art Gallery, Kelowna. To Apr 30

First installed last October in the Rotary Courtyard of the Kelowna Art Gallery, this site-specific work by brothers Lucas Glenn and Mat Glenn is a self-contained live/work structure conceived of as “eco-utopian.” Gallery visitors are invited to enter and make use of the small, self-contained structure, equipped with its own lighting, power outlets and charging station, while considering ideas around environmental sustainability, the creative possibilities of DIY culture, and alternative workspaces in unlikely locations.

GWENESSA LAM, WHAT MAGIC, 2018. COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

TRACE
Art Gallery at Evergreen Cultural Centre, Coquitlam. To Apr 26

Riffing on the idea of the “black mirror” – that is, the computer screen – Trace brings together the work of two interdisciplinary artists, Gwenessa Lam and Hyung-Min Yoon. Lam is represented here by an installation of photo-etchings and a book whose primary image, sourced online, is of a house on fi re. Yoon’s fi lm installation quotes from 15th-century Confucian woodblock prints, their moral lessons confounded by allusions to contemporary cartoon culture and black humour.

KRISTA KILVERT, ANY TOWN, ANYWHERE, ANY PLACE, 2020

KRISTA KILVERT: BEHIND CLOSED DOORS
O’Connor Group Art Gallery, Chilliwack. To May 2

Artist and community worker Krista Kilvert has created a mixed-media installation with a strong social message. Employing mirrors, statistics, framed commentary by victims and some 265 small paper “houses” embossed with text, she confronts us with the appalling truths of domestic violence. Whether described as IPV (intimate partner violence), gender-based violence or femicide, the phenomenon exists in every country, culture and socio-economic circumstance, Kilvert tells us. Be aware.

VALÉRIE BLASS, L’HOMME RÉPARÉ, 2019

VALÉRIE BLASS
Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver. To May 9

In her probing of the visual tropes associated with the human body, Montreal sculptor Valérie Blass employs both traditional and unexpected media and materials. These range from marble, wood and plaster to photographs, spray paint and found objects, engineered toward the creation of installations, assemblages and free-standing sculptures. Some of her recent works suggest a kind of urban anthropology, examining the casual ways in which we dress and disport ourselves in our everyday lives.

CURRENCY
New Media Gallery, New Westminster. To May 10

This international group show challenges viewers to investigate ideas and phenomena revolving around the theme of currency. Through multi-channel videos, interactive installations and a sophisticated assortment of digital technologies, the six artists represented here conjure up the often volatile relationship between currency and value. Individual subjects include market crashes, fair labour practices, distribution of wealth, digital surveillance, real estate speculation, the art market and economic theory. Phew!

LINDSAY MCINTYRE, A STILL FROM A 2012 FILM, 2020

LINDSAY MCINTYRE
Marion Scott Gallery/Kardosh Projects, Vancouver. Apr 4 – May 2

A film artist of Inuit/Settler descent, Lindsay McIntyre is acclaimed for her experimental work with high-contrast black-and-white 16 mm film, which she processes and alters by hand. Her art explores Inuit life and family history while simultaneously playing with documentary techniques, grainy textures and shifting focal length. For this exhibition, and as part of the Capture Photography Festival, McIntyre focuses on the symbolically charged subject of hands, isolating and mounting fi lm frames and extracts in light boxes.

TO SPEAK WITH A GOLDEN VOICE
Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver. Apr 22 – Oct 4

The great Haida artist Bill Reid (1920-1998), whose sculptures, jewelry and silkscreen prints are featured in permanent displays at the gallery that bears his name, is also now the focus of a temporary exhibition. Guest curated by artist and activist Gwaai Edenshaw, who apprenticed with Reid, the show brings together “rarely seen treasures,” accounts of Reid narrated by his friends and community members, and newly commissioned works inspired by him. All bear witness to his creative legacy.

PETER ASPELL, GENTLEMANCHINE, 2003

PETER ASPELL: HOMAGE
Pendulum Gallery, Vancouver. Apr 25 – May 16

One of Vancouver’s leading post-war painters, Peter Aspell (1918-2004) has been described as a “primitive expressionist,” his figurative art evincing a range of interests and influences, from ancient Egyptian art to contemporary robotics. His vividly hued and expressively painted works are often characterized by surreal juxtapositions of symbols and motifs – human, animal and mechanistic. Organized by Gallery Jones, the show also includes paintings by Enn Erisalu, Otto Rogers and Gary Pearson.

KENT MONKMAN, THE DADDIES, 2016

SHAME AND PREJUDICE: A STORY OF RESILIENCE
Museum of Anthropology at UBC, Vancouver. May 8 – Oct 12

This touring exhibition features paintings, installations and sculptures by internationally acclaimed Cree artist Kent Monkman, together with historical objects borrowed from public and private collections across Canada. Starring Monkman’s “gender-fluid, time-travelling” alter ego Miss Chief Eagle Testickle, the show challenges, subverts and rewrites 150 years of colonial history. One of Monkman’s dazzling and disruptive strategies is to insert Indigenous figures into well-known 19th-century paintings.

MOY SUTHERLAND, EAGLE PANEL, 2019

Ɂuuyatuk qumaahiišił: RESPECT EVERYTHING
Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery, Vancouver. May 23 – Jul 23

This solo show by Nuu-chah-nulth artist Moy Sutherland is shaped by his respect for the interconnectedness of all things – natural and supernatural, earthly and celestial. His art cherishes the cultural teachings of his forebears and the knowledge and insights of the master carvers with whom he apprenticed, including Art Thompson and Carey Newman. Sutherland works across many media and scales, from totem poles to gold jewelry, and is especially admired for his cedar carvings inlaid with abalone and operculum.