Home Sep – Oct 2018 Alberta Vignettes

Sep – Oct 2018 Alberta Vignettes

by admin

By Robin Laurence

KRISTEN KEEGAN, BLOCK TRAP, 2014.

VISIONS OF THE HUNT
Esplanade Art Gallery, Medicine Hat, To Sep 15

As the title suggests, this powerful and sometimes controversial group show explores the nature and practice of hunting and the shifting relationships between wild crea-tures and the human beings who may prey upon them. Drawing on the observations, experiences and traditions of modern and contemporary Prairie artists, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, the works here range from fur-swathed portraits of Europeanroyalty to life-size sculptures of bright red stags wreathed in horns.

JERRY HEINE, ALONG THE WEST COAST TRAIL, 2015.

JERRY HEINE
Bugera Matheson Gallery, Edmonton, Sep 22 – Oct 5

An accomplished watercolourist, Jerry Heine creates landscape images fi lled with co-lour, light and liveliness. His work, which seems to bring together infl uences as diverse as French Post-Impressionism, historic Chinese ink painting and the English watercolour tradition, has been widely exhibited and is represented in public and private collections across Canada and the United States. Based in Edmonton, Heine is also recognized as an educator, mentor and adjudicator at the University of Alberta. 

HASEGAWA, KUBO, AND CERAMICS ’69POSTER DESIGNER UNKNOWN.

UNPACKING IKG: 60 YEARS A GALLERY
Illingworth Kerr Gallery, Calgary, Sep 25 – Dec 8

This show marks six decades of exhibiting art at the Alberta College of Art and Design. (Although art had been shown at the college for many years previously, 1958 was the year a permanent curator was hired and purpose-built exhibition spaces were inaugu-rated.) A timeline, illustrated with posters and other materials drawn from the archival holdings of a number of institutions, has been created to celebrate the gallery’s lively history – and prehistory.

LYNDAL OSBORNE, CORAL PROJECT (DETAIL), 2018. IMAGE COURTESY THE ARTIST.

LYNDAL OSBORNE
Nickle Galleries, Calgary, Sep 27 – Dec 15

A survey of sculptural work by this acclaimed Australian-born, Edmonton-based artist, Mutation of the Commons folds an examination of genetic modifi cation into her ongo-ing concern about environmental issues and her themes of transformation. Most re-cent among the nine monumental sculptures on view is her Coral Project, a complex, multi-component wall-mounted work that combines natural forms such as seashells, leaves and antennae in a hybrid dance of the beautiful and the grotesque.

LEAH DORION,TURTLE WOMEN DRUMMERS, 2010.

LEAH DORION: DANCING THE EARTH
Art Gallery of St. Albert, St. Albert, Oct 6 – Nov 10

Leah Dorion’s vibrantly coloured and intricately patterned artworks evoke beading and embroidery, honouring “the sacred feminine” and “the spiritual strength” of her female ancestors. A Métis artist and storyteller, Dorion incorporates shells, birchbark, river rocks and mica fl akes into her paintings, adding elements of tactility to her visual imagery. In her artist’s statement, she declares that her new work “celebrates the beauty of the earth” and the energy abounding in “this great circle of life.”