Home Nov 2018 – Jan 2019 British Columbia Vignettes

Nov 2018 – Jan 2019 British Columbia Vignettes

by admin

By Robin Laurance

SHINSUI ITO, BEAUTY AND FIREFLY, JAPANESE, c. 1960. FUNDS PROVIDED BY JUDITH PATT

REMEMBERING A PATRON
Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, Victoria. To Jan 6, 2019

The late scholar Judith Patt is honoured in this show of historical Asian artworks she donated to the gallery, including Chinese and Japanese paintings and woodblock prints. Born in the United States and educated there in both architecture and art history, Patt joined the faculty of the University of Victoria in 1980. Her ardent support of the AGGV over a period of nearly four decades included not only donations of art and money, but also service on the gallery’s board of directors and acquisitions committee.

JAAD KUUJUS, INTERFACE. PHOTO: DAVID KOPPE

INTERFACE: THE WOVEN ARTWORK OF JAAD KUUJUS
Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver. To Jan 9, 2019

In the act of weaving, Kwakwaka’wakw and Haida artist Jaad Kuujus (Meghann O’Brien) says, “We weave backwards and forwards through time, creating space and the complex formlines and histories of our culture.” Raised in Alert Bay, she began weaving in the summer of 2007, while working on a commercial fi shing boat. She has since become an esteemed maker of intricate Naaxiin (Chilkat) textiles and tightly woven cedar bark baskets. Her art explores the conversation between the contemporary and the traditional.

KAMEELAH JANAN RASHEED, HOW TO SUFFER POLITELY AND OTHER ETIQUETTE. IMAGE COURTESY TRANSMISSION GALLERY, GLASGOW, 2016

KAMEELAH JANAN RASHEED
Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver. To Mar 17, 2019

Issues of Black subjectivity preoccupy this American artist, whose text installations are on view in the CAG’s Nelson Street windows and o -site at the Yaletown-Roundhouse Canada Line station. Whether employing large, black, machine-made letters on a bright yellow ground or handcrafted letters in black and white against a soft pink backdrop, Rasheed uses words to address social justice issues and challenge viewers’ complacency. Her language is often an arresting blend of irony and ambiguity.

TAISHA PAGGETT, I BELIEVE IN ECHOES, 2018. PERFORMANCE DOCUMENTATION JUNE 17, 2018, PART OF MADE IN LA 2018, HAMMER MUSEUM, LOS ANGELES. PHOTO: JUSTIN SULLIVAN

TAISHA PAGGETT: I BELIEVE IN ECHOES
Audain Gallery, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, SFU Vancouver. To Dec 8

Taisha Paggett’s interdisciplinary exhibition, developed during the Los Angeles-based dance artist’s Audain residency, “considers the somatic experience of the meadow.” She employs the idea and space of the meadow as a means of and metaphor for exploring the relationship between indoors and outdoors and examining culturally or racially defined conditions of access and restriction. Curator Amy Kazymerchyk writes that Paggett’s work “creates breathing room for the echoes of multiple histories to be felt and heard.”

TAIGA CHIBA, IN THE REALM OF MAYA 8, 2018

ENTR’ACTE: THE WORKS OF TAIGA CHIBA
Art Beatus, Vancouver. To Dec 7

Born in Japan, based in Vancouver and widely travelled, Taiga Chiba locates his newest work “between two Mayas,” that is, between the Hindu goddess of visions and illusions and the Maya civilization of Mesoamerica. Chiba’s recent residencies in India and Mexico have resulted in mixed-media works that employ serigraphy, ink painting, embroidery and drawing. Playful and sometimes surrealistic, his images express his observations of and experiences within distant cultures.

FRED HOLLINGSWORTH, DESIGN FOR A SHOW HOUSE, c. 1960

FRED HOLLINGSWORTH: ART OF ARCHITECTURE
West Vancouver Art Museum, West Vancouver. To Dec 22

One of the pioneers of West Coast modernist architecture is celebrated in this exhibition of artworks he created, furnishings he designed and architectural drawings he rendered in watercolour. Fred Hollingsworth, who died in 2015 at the age of 98, is strongly associated with post-war residential architecture in Vancouver. Characteristic of his houses was the use of post-and-beam construction, built-in cabinetry and inexpensive building materials, making his designs accessible to all.

DANA CLAXTON, CULTURAL BELONGINGS, 2016 COLLECTION OF ROSALIND AND AMIR ADNANI

DANA CLAXTON: FRINGING THE CUBE
Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver. To Feb 3, 2019

This much-anticipated exhibition surveys the career of internationally acclaimed media artist Dana Claxton. Based in Vancouver, of Hunkpapa Lakota heritage, she often uses formally beautiful and emotionally gripping imagery to engage viewers in ideas surrounding Indigenous history, identity and culture. Whether working in film, photography, video, performance or text, Claxton dismantles stereotypes while also provoking us to reconsider the social construction of gender, landscape and the body.

JAY SENETCHKO, WHAT THE THUNDER SAID, 2017

JAY SENETCHKO: A PAINTER’S PROCESS
Pendulum Gallery, Vancouver. Nov 12 – Dec 15

Best known as a figurative painter and member of the art collective Phantoms in the Front Yard, Jay Senetchko is represented here by a broad body of work created over the past 10 years. Ranging from large-scale paintings to drawings, photographs and collages, the pieces illuminate the artist’s way of working as well as his recurring themes. They also demonstrate his belief in painting’s direct social engagement – and his disavowal of academic and theory-based art.

OLGA CAMPBELL, TANIA, UNDATED

OLGA CAMPBELL: A WHISPER ACROSS TIME
Sidney and Gertrude Zack Gallery, Vancouver. Nov 15 – Dec 9

Poetry, prose and mixed-media paintings and drawings come together in Olga Campbell’s story of one family’s experiences of the Holocaust. A Whisper Across Time originally took the form of a multimedia exhibition and later became a book, which will be launched at the show’s opening. Described as “a multi-dimensional snapshot of family losses and inter-generational trauma,” the show and book seek a path of healing but also serve as a “cautionary tale,” alerting us to contemporary social and political events.

GARY WYATT, SQUAMISH  CHRISTMAS DAY, 2018

SOUNDSCAPE / LANDSCAPE
The ACT Art Gallery, Maple Ridge. Jan 12 – Feb 23, 2019

This experimental exhibition pairs the work of Jay Bundy Johnson with that of Gary Wyatt to probe the way sound may infl uence the gallery visitor’s visual-art experience. Johnson is an acclaimed sound artist who creates ingenious electronic sculptures that produce an array of intriguing sounds. Wyatt, best known as an art dealer and author of a number of respected books on the Indigenous art of the Northwest Coast, is represented here by his mossy and mysterious landscape drawings.