Home Contact | Advertising Subscribe
Search Listings
Alberta British Columbia Oregon Washington
Exhibition Previews
Gallery Websites
Conservation Corner

SEARCH EDITORIAL
To find gallery listings use search at page top right.

  Back

Deborah Koenker, Bely Ramón Martinez. San Luis Potosi

Deborah Koenker, Bely Ramón Martinez. San Luis Potosi (2014), ink jet print [Kelowna Art Gallery, Kelowna BC, Jul 17-Oct 30]

Deborah Koenker: Grapes and Tortillas

Kelowna Art Gallery
Kelowna BC – Jul 16-Oct 30, 2016

Deborah Koenker,  José Luis, Topilejo, D.F

Deborah Koenker, José Luis, Topilejo, D.F. (2014), ink jet print [Kelowna Art Gallery, Kelowna BC, Jul 17-Oct 30]

Deborah Koenker, Faviola Medina, Oaxaca

Deborah Koenker, Faviola Medina, Oaxaca (2014), ink jet print [Kelowna Art Gallery, Kelowna BC, Jul 17-Oct 30]

Deborah Koenker, Salvador Sandoval, Queretaro

Deborah Koenker, Salvador Sandoval, Queretaro (2014), ink jet print [Kelowna Art Gallery, Kelowna BC, Jul 17-Oct 30]

British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley is renowned for its seasonal bounty of fruits and vegetables. More recently, the area has achieved distinction for its winemaking. But someone has to pick this food. And because so much of it is available in such a short period of time, growers have had to look beyond the Valley to bolster their workforce. It is here, on the often unspoken topic of labour, that artist Deborah Koeneker had an idea.

Inspired by the Okanagan Valley’s long history of migrant workers, Koeneker set out to meet the men and women who travel to the region every summer, eager to hear their stories, share in their experiences. The result is a large-scale installation of photographs and sculptural elements “celebrating their hard work, their contribution to the Canadian economy, and their dedication to their families – from whom they are separated for long periods.”

Most of the portraits feature subjects from the waist up facing the camera, a text of their choice written (in Spanish) on a dried tortilla. Some of the messages are simple and offer only a name and a blessing; others speak well of their time in Canada and a desire to stay longer; all of them, in some way, feel addressed to those back home.

Michael Turner


 Sun, Sep 18, 2016