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Pablo Picasso, Minotaur Caressing a Sleeping Woman

Pablo Picasso, Minotaur Caressing a Sleeping Woman (1933), etching [Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jun 9-Aug 28] © 2016 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Graphic Masters: Dürer, Rembrandt, Hogarth,
Goya, Picasso, R. Crumb

Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, WA – Jun 9-Aug 28, 2016

Rembrandt van Rijn, Self-portrait with Saskia

Rembrandt van Rijn, Self-portrait with Saskia (1636), etching [Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jun 9-Aug 28] Photo: Beth Mann

Francisco Goya, Los Caprichos: Asta su Abuelo (And so was his gradfather)

Francisco Goya, Los Caprichos: Asta su Abuelo (And so was his gradfather) (1796-1797), aquatint [Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jun 9-Aug 28] Private collection

Albrecht Dürer, Knight, Death and the Devil

Albrecht Dürer, Knight, Death and the Devil (1513-1514), engraving [Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jun 9-Aug 28] Private collection

R. Crumb, The Book of Genesis Illustrated by R. Crumb
R. Crumb, The Book of Genesis Illustrated by R. Crumb (2009), pen and ink on paper [Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jun 9-Aug 28] © R. Crumb 2016 Collection of Lucas Museum of Narrative Art


Considering that printmaking was revived as a legitimate contemporary art form in the 20th century, it is high time the Seattle Art Museum is trotting out several centuries of masterpieces to demonstrate how it all got started. Assembled over decades, thanks to perspicacious collectors like Leo Wallerstein, SAM’s graphic masters on view give visitors and art students an in-depth chance to see the earliest examples of engravings, etchings, lithographs, aquatints and woodcuts, beginning with Albrecht Dürer’s large woodcut version of the Passion of Christ (1497-1510).

Two Spanish artists, Francisco Goya and Pablo Picasso, each extended the chemically complicated medium of acid etching in his own way. Goya’s legendary Los Caprichos (1799) are now seen as the dawn of political protest art with their satires of aristocrats, judges and clergy. In the Vollard Suite (1930-37), Picasso extended Goya’s racy angle with frank scenes of mythological figures caught in piquant situations.

Besides Hogarth’s Rake’s Progress (1733), another tale of sexual debauchery, R. Crumb, perhaps the crudest and most popular of recent cartoonists, contributes his take on the Book of Genesis.

Matthew Kangas





















































































William Hogarth, A Harlot’s Fall

William Hogarth, A Harlot’s Fall (1732), engraving [Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jun 9-Aug 28] Photo: Beth Mann



 Thu, Jun 9, 2016