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Barbara Cole, Falling Through Time

Barbara Cole, Falling Through Time (2016), chromogenic print face-mounted to Plexiglas [Bau-Xi Gallery, Vancouver BC, Apr 1-15]

Barbara Cole: Falling Through Time

Bau-Xi Gallery
Vancouver BC – Apr 1-15, 2017

Barbara Cole, Inverforth Close

Barbara Cole, Inverforth Close (2016), chromogenic print face-mounted to Plexiglas [Bau-Xi Gallery, Vancouver BC, Apr 1-15]

Barbara Cole, Lost in Time

Barbara Cole, Lost in Time (2016), chromogenic print face-mounted to Plexiglas [Bau-Xi Gallery, Vancouver BC, Apr 1-15]

Barbara Cole, Palace Gardens

Barbara Cole, Palace Gardens (2016), chromogenic print face-mounted to Plexiglas [Bau-Xi Gallery, Vancouver BC, Apr 1-15]

Barbara Cole, Lost in Time

Barbara Cole, Rock Garden (2016), chromogenic print face-mounted to Plexiglas [Bau-Xi Gallery, Vancouver BC, Apr 1-15]

Barbara Cole, Hampton Court Pergola

Barbara Cole, Hampton Court Pergola (2016), chromogenic print face-mounted to Plexiglas [Bau-Xi Gallery, Vancouver BC, Apr 1-15]

Those familiar with the pictures of Barbara Cole will know an artist who, for the past 30 years, has used photography to achieve painterly effects. While some of these effects have long been available through software programs, Cole has preferred to work in-camera. Why use Photoshop to flatten perspective when you can climb a ladder and shoot from above? And if you want your figures to look like they are floating?

In the early 2000s Cole donned a wetsuit and, with a specialized camera, began to explore the medium of water. As she writes in her artist statement, “[water] is a natural lens that refocuses and reinterprets my painterly aesthetic.” In a recent documentary she says, “Water’s my office. Water is where I get my ideas from.”

An idea that Cole had 20 years ago was a garden series based on her travels in England. But because the photographs did not achieve the desired overtone, they languished. Until recently.

“In essence I am collaborating with my past,” says Cole of her Falling Through Time series, where the garden pictures act as backgrounds to her floating figures. “Every show is a new language. This show has been the language of retouching and blending and making things more than the sum of their parts.”

Michael Turner


 Tue, Apr 4, 2017