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Feather headdress

Feather headdress (pre-1989), parrot feather and cotton fibre [Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver BC, Mar 10-Jan 28] ©Museum of Anthropology at UBC, Photo by Kyla Baily

Amazonia: The Rights of Nature

Museum of Anthropology
Vancouver BC – Mar 10, 2017-Jan 28, 2018

Jairo, Norkoro Spirit Mask

Bird necklace (pre-1928), birds, fibre and seed [Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver BC, Mar 10-Jan 28] ©Museum of Anthropology at UBC, Photo by Jessica Bushey

Like the Cascadia bioregion in which this magazine circulates, Amazonia is a land-based nomenclature that speaks beyond the sum of its South American political boundaries to address a global mode of production that threatens its very existence – a threat not only to a way of life, but also to a rainforest that produces a staggering 20 percent of the planet’s oxygen.

The exhibition subtitle is derived from the Spanish buen vivir, a social philosophy that refuses the notion of nature as property in favour of the inalienable rights of ecosystems – plants, animals, people and other organisms – to live and flourish. According to the MOA, “[t]he concept aligns directly with value systems intrinsic to indigenous South American cultures, and serves as a rallying cry to move beyond Western ideals and practices of development largely measured by profit.”

On display at the MOA’s O’Brian Gallery are textiles, baskets, ceramics and jewelry assembled exclusively from the museum’s hefty collection. Of note are not just the objects themselves, but the manner in which they are composed, many of them made up of recognizable materials such as vegetal fibre, wood and clay, others employing ingenious applications of animal parts.

Michael Turner

Jairo, Norkoro Spirit Mask

Jairo, Norkoro Spirit Mask (between 1975 and 1987), bark, resin, balsa wood, rubber and clay pigment [Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver BC, Mar 10-Jan 28] ©Museum of Anthropology at UBC, Photo by Kyla Baily


 Tue, Apr 4, 2017