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Chuck Close, Lucas/Woodcut

Chuck Close, Lucas/Woodcut (1993), woodcut with pochoir [Schack Art Center, Everett WA, May 12-Sep 5] Courtesy of Pace Editions, Inc., and the artist

Chuck Close: Prints, Process and Collaboration

Schack Art Center
Everett WA – May 12-Sep 5, 2016

Chuck Close, Self-Portrait (Pink T-Shirt)

Chuck Close, Self-Portrait (Pink T-Shirt) (2013), archival watercolor pigment print on Hahnemühle rag paper [Schack Art Center, Everett WA, May 12-Sep 5] Courtesy of Pace Editions, Inc., and the artist

Chuck Close, Cecily/Felt Hand Stamp

Chuck Close, Cecily/Felt Hand Stamp (2012), multiple made using felt stamps to hand apply oil paints on a silkscreen ground [Schack Art Center, Everett WA, May 12-Sep 5] Courtesy of the artist and Pace Editions, Inc., New York

Marcia Perkins, See, Hear, Speak No Evil

Chuck Close, Georgia (1982), Pulp-paper on canvas [Schack Art Center, Everett WA, May 12-Sep 5] Courtesy of the artist

Born in nearby Monroe, Washington, Chuck Close moved to the East Coast shortly after college, where he helped turn the New York art world away from big-drip painting toward Conceptual Realism and Photo Figuration. In particular, he cleverly adapted abstract trends, such as Minimalism and Serialism, to fracture and revolutionize a genre of representational painting – portraits.

This is the first time since he graduated from Everett High School in 1957 that Close’s art has been exhibited in his home county. Hailed as a key transitional figure in contemporary art, Close has influenced countless artists involved in portraiture, psychological expressionism and complex sequential printmaking. Metaphors for deconstructing or dismantling psychological identity and personality, Close’s portraits upend a shaggy tradition that badly needed renovation.

Subject of a two-volume 2010 biography by Christopher Finch, Close’s life and art have been exhaustively documented, all centred around the paralyzing stroke he suffered at the age of 48 in 1988. Surrounded by armies of studio assistants, and after years of rehabilitation, Close not only climbed back, he surmounted adversity in pursuit of excellence and achievement. Revolutionizing portrait painting was followed by rethinking photography and printmaking simultaneously, all of which are on view in Everett.

Matthew Kangas


 Fri, Apr 8, 2016