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Alexander Archipenko, Torso in Space

Alexander Archipenko, Torso in Space (1935), aluminum [Frye Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jan 28-Apr 30] Alexander Archipenko © 2017 Estate of Alexander Archipenko/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Archipenko: A Modern Legacy

Frye Art Museum
Seattle WA – Jan 28-Apr 30, 2017

Alexander Archipenko, Boxing (Boxe)

Alexander Archipenko, Boxing (Boxe) (1914), bronze [Frye Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jan 28-Apr 30] Alexander Archipenko © 2017 Estate of Archipenko / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Alexander Archipenko, Architectural Figure

Alexander Archipenko, Architectural Figure (1939–54), painted terra-cotta [Frye Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jan 28-Apr 30] Alexander Archipenko © 2017 Estate of Alexander Archipenko/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Alexander Archipenko, Nine Work Sketches for Sculpture

Alexander Archipenko, Nine Work Sketches for Sculpture (1935–42), pencil on paper [Frye Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jan 28-Apr 30] Alexander Archipenko © 2017 Estate of Alexander Archipenko / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

This is an exhibition for which I have been waiting 40 years. The secret, key influence on the “University Moderns” at the University of Washington during teaching appointments in 1936, 1937 and 1951, Alexander Archipenko came into contact with students such as Viola Patterson and George Tsutakawa, who transferred his Constructivist figuration into sublime female figures of terra cotta, bronze and stone.

A direct link from Seattle to European Modernism was established by the Ukrainian-born Archipenko (1887-1964) and reinforced by Paris-trained UW faculty such as Ambrose Patterson, Walter F. Isaacs, Spencer Moseley and Wendell Brazeau. Including the Seattle Art Museum’s iconic The Bride (1936), there are more than 60 sculptures, drawings, paintings, reliefs and related documentary photographs.

Visitors can learn more about an important artist who arrived in New York in 1923 with his new American wife, set up several private art schools and became part of the surge of modern art on North American soil. His sculptures are sleek, elegant and earthy, crafted by the tall man from Kiev, who made sure that the New World understood his significance. As he once said in a public meeting where Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth were praised, “It is I — I who invented the hole!”

Matthew Kangas

fryemuseum.org


































































Alexander Archipenko, Cleopatra

Alexander Archipenko, Cleopatra (1957), wood, Bakelite, found objects, paint [Frye Art Museum, Seattle WA, Jan 28-Apr 30] Alexander Archipenko © 2017 Estate of Alexander Archipenko/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


 Wed, Feb 8, 2017