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Shuvinai Ashoona, Untitled

Shuvinai Ashoona, Untitled (2009), coloured pencil and ink on paper [Marion Scott Gallery/Kardosh Projects, Vancouver BC, Mar 19-Apr 23

Shuvinai Ashoona: A For Sure World

Marion Scott Gallery/kardosh projects
Vancouver BC – Mar 19-Apr 30, 2016

Shuvinai Ashoona, Untitled

Shuvinai Ashoona, Untitled (2011), coloured pencil and ink on paper [Marion Scott Gallery/Kardosh Projects, Vancouver BC, Mar 19-Apr 23]

Shuvinai Ashoona, Untitled

Shuvinai Ashoona, Untitled (2010), coloured pencil and ink on paper [Marion Scott Gallery/Kardosh Projects, Vancouver BC, Mar 19-Apr 23]

Shuvinai Ashoona, Untitled

Shuvinai Ashoona, Untitled, coloured pencil and ink on paper [Marion Scott Gallery/Kardosh Projects, Vancouver BC, Mar 19-Apr 23]


It is symptomatic of Canada’s colonial history that when the topic of Canadian art is raised, the first thing that often comes to mind is the peopleless landscape painting of the Group of Seven – or more recent interdisciplinary forays in urban centres such as Halifax, Montreal and Vancouver. That the works from Cape Dorset are rarely mentioned is a reminder that when it comes to this country’s art and artists, there are two worlds: Canadian and Indigenous.

For over 60 years, Cape Dorset artists have produced thousands of drawings, prints and carvings that reflect not only what it is to live in Canada’s far north, but also what the influence of modernization – and its publicist, Modernism – has been. And while the work of Kenojuak Ashevak, Nuna Parr and Pudlo Pudlat continues to resonate, younger generations emerge and, with them, new ways.

One such artist is Shuvinai Ashoona, whose drawings favour a vast colour palette and, because of their varied perspectives, owe as much to film, television and comic books as they do to the work of her elders. Most notable in Ashoona’s work is her penchant for depicting less obvious activities over those associated with social and economic production.

Michael Turner



















 Fri, Apr 8, 2016